Irish Canadian Famine Research

Irish Canadian Famine Research

Tag: New York

New Publication: Women and the Great Hunger (Christine Kinealy, Jason King, Ciaran Reilly)

 

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http://www.corkuniversitypress.com/Women-and-the-Great-Hunger-p/9780990945420.htm

Even considering recent advances in the development of women’s studies as a discipline, women remain underrepresented in the history and historiography of the Great Hunger. The various roles played by women, including as landowners, relief-givers, philanthropists, proselytizers and providers for the family, have received little attention.

This publication examines the diverse and still largely unexplored role of women during the Great Hunger, shedding light on how women experienced and shaped the tragedy that unfolded in Ireland between 1845 and 1852. In addition to more traditional sources, the contributors also draw on folklore and popular culture.

Women and the Great Hunger brings together the work of some of the leading researchers in Irish studies, with new scholarship, methodologies and perspectives. This book takes a major step toward advancing our understanding of the Great Hunger.

Christine Kinealy is Director of Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University. Jason King is Irish Research Council Postdoctoral Research Fellow, National University of Ireland, Galway and Ciarn Reilly is a Research Fellow, Centre for the Study of Historic Irish Houses & Estates, Maynooth University

Contents

Introduction. ‘This expertise is hard won’. Women and the Great Hunger in Ireland

Steadfast Women

‘Never call me a novelist’: Cecil Woodham-Smith and the making of the Great Hunger – Christine Kinealy (Quinnipiac University)

Asenath Nicholson and school children in Ireland – Maureen Murphy (Quinnipiac University)

Agency and Action

‘Nearly starved to death’: The female petition during the Great Hunger – Ciaran Reilly (Maynooth University)

The women of county Leitrim respond to the hunger – Gerard McAtasney (Independent Scholar)

‘Meddlers amongst us: women, priests, and authority in Famine-era Ireland’ – Cara Delay (College of Charleston)

‘Nearly naked’: clothing and the Great Hunger in Ireland – Daphne Wolf (Drew University)

Hidden Histories

The Famine Irish, the Grey Nuns, and the fever sheds of Montreal: prostitution and female religious institution building – Jason King (National University of Ireland, Galway)

‘Permanent deadweight’: female pauper emigration from Mountbellew Workhouse to Canada – Gerard Moran (Maynooth University)

The Lore of women: Irish expressive culture in New England after the Great Hunger – Eileen Moore Quinn (College of Charleston)

Publicizing Pain

Keeping hope alive: Jane Elgee and the Great Famine Matthew Skwiat – (Rochester University)

‘Skeletons at the feast’: Lady Wilde’s poetry and 19th century Irish critiques of famine and empire – Amy Martin (Mount Holyoke College)

‘Revolting scenes of famine’: Frances Power Cobbe and the Great Hunger – Maureen O’Connor (University College Cork)

 

New Directions

Nature and nurture: The Great Famine and epigenetic change in Ireland – Oonagh Walsh (Glasgow Caledonian University)

Amongst strangers: The Sisters of Charity and the New York Famine Irish -Turlough McConnell (Turlough McConnell Communications)

Lady Sligo and her letters: mounting an inaugural exhibition – Sandy Letourneau O’Hare and Robert A. Young, Jr. (Arnold Bernhard Library, Quinnipiac University)

The Earl Grey Irish orphan scheme, 1848 -1850 and the Irish diaspora in Australia – Rebecca Abbott (Quinnipiac University)

Postscript and A woman’s place is on the curriculum – Ruth Riddick (Open Door Counselling)

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New Deadline for Abstracts March 17: Children and the Great Hunger in Ireland Conference, Quinnipiac University June 14-17 2017

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CFP: Children and the Great Hunger in Ireland Conference

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Call for Papers: Children and the Great Hunger in Ireland

Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University, in partnership with the Irish Heritage Trust at StrokestownPark, is hosting an international conference,

“Children and the Great Hunger in Ireland.” In any sustained period of food hunger and famine, children are one of the most vulnerable groups in terms of disease and mortality. The Great Hunger that occurred in Ireland between 1845 and 1852 is no exception. This conference will explore the impact of famine on children and young adults. While the focus will be on Ireland’s Great Hunger, a comparative approach is encouraged. It is anticipated that a selection of papers will be published.

  • Children and poor relief •Children and philanthropy •Abandonment and societal shame •Children’s literature and children in literature •Visual representations of children and young adults •Childhood diseases •Vagrancy and prostitution •Children and crime •Averted births and demography •Proselytizing the young •Children in print and material culture •Teaching the Great Hunger •The Earl Grey Scheme •The churches and children •Children in folklore •Sport and leisure •Famine and the family •Children of the Big House •Children and emigration •Memory and survivors’ accounts •Witness accounts •Memorializing the young

Papers are welcomed from all disciplines and from both established scholars and new researchers. Abstracts of 250-300 words for 20-minute papers or proposals for roundtable sessions on specific themes, together with 100-word biographical statements, should be directed to:

Professor Christine Kinealy: christine.kinealy@quinnipiac.edu And Dr Jason King: faminestudies@irishheritagetrust.ie

Deadline for receipt of abstracts 31 January 2017

“Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger” Exhibit Launch at Quinnipiac University and the Montreal Irish Memorial Park Foundation

“Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger” Exhibit launch at Quinnipiac University.  The exhibit runs until March 18, 2016.

New exhibition now open to public

Grey Nuns exhibit setup

Sarah Churchill sets up Grey Nuns Exhibit.

Quinnipiac exhibit setup

 

Sarah Churchill sets up Grey Nuns Exhibit.

Grey Nuns launch 8

Co-curators, Professor Christine Kinealy of Quinnipiac University and Dr. Jason King of Galway University at the reception on March 31, 2015.

Quinnpiac launch 2

President John Lahey alongside Consul General from Canada, John F. Prato.

Grey Nuns launch 2

Dr. Jason King gives a guided tour of the exhibition to Marie-Claude Francoeur, Quebec Delegate to New England.

Grey Nuns launch 3

A copy of “The Awful Disclosures of Maria Monk”, a staple of anti-Catholic nativism published nearly a decade before the arrival of famine migrants in Canada, on view in the exhibition.

Grey Nuns launch 4

Consul General for Canada, John F. Prato, speaking at the reception.

Grey Nuns launch 5

Professor Christine Kinealy speaks about the Grey Nun’s habit on view in the exhibition.

Quinnipiac launch 4

From left to right, Barbara Jones, Consul General from Ireland, Marie-Claude Francoeur, Quebec Delegate to New England, Professor Christine Kinealy, John F. Prato, Consul General from Canada, and Dr. Jason King on a private tour of the exhibition in the Arnold Bernhard Library.

 

Quinnpiac launch 5

John F. Prato, Consul General from Canada, speaks with Dr. and Mrs. John Lahey.

Montreal Irish Monument Foundation with Black Rock

Co-curator Dr. Jason King meets with Directors of Montreal Irish Memorial Park Foundation Fergus Keyes, Victor Boyle, and Donovan King to discuss future plans.