Irish Canadian Famine Research

Irish Canadian Famine Research

Tag: Ireland Canada Quebec Montreal Toronto Strokestown Roscommon National Famine Commemoration Irish Diaspora Orphans 1847

Walk for Tragic Ship Carricks in Sligo

From Paul, Deering, Sligo Champion: (07/03/2015)

http://www.independent.ie/regionals/sligochampion/news/walk-for-tragic-ship-31034569.html

Carricks bell

Carricks Bell

A family’s 21-mile walk to get to Sligo Port to leave for Canada during famine times on a ship that eventually sank will be commemorated next month.

On 4th April, Rose Marie Stanley with her husband Terry will lead a Famine Trail Commemoration Walk from Cross, Keash to Sligo Port.  Rose Marie is a fifth generation descendent of Patrick and Sarah Kaveney, who with their six children did this same walk on the 4th April 1847, when as famine victims they left Ireland in the hope of a better life in Canada.

Mullaghmore and Cliffoney Historical Society in conjunction with descendents of different branches of the Kaveney family and other walking groups are undertaking this walk in memory of Patrick and Sarah and their six children, and all those who sailed with them to Canada on the ill fated Carricks in April 1847. The walk is 21 miles long and will start at the old Kaveney homestead in Cross at 9am and will proceed through Ballymote, Colloney, Ballysodare, and on to Sligo Port where they will arrive about 4pm. A short ceremony will take place at the pontoon beside the Custom and Ballast Quays, from where the Carricks set sail on its final journey.

Patrick and Sarah Kaveney were tenants of Lord Palmerston and became the first batch of his Assisted Emigrants to leave Sligo in 1847 for Quebec. Patrick and Sarah left on the 5th April 1847. At Sligo Port they were joined by 28 other families, a total of 173 emigrants, all former Palmerston tenants.

Some 17 of the families came from the Ballymote estate, 5 more came from Ennismurray, and 6 came from Ahamlish. Just over three weeks after leaving Sligo these emigrants entered the Gulf of St. Lawrence and were in sight of the Canadian coast when the Carricks was caught in a snow storm and crashed into the notorious Cap des Rosiers. Only 48 passengers survived. Patrick and Sarah with their son Martin survived; their five daughters were drowned.

They set up home in Jersey Cove and had four more children In 1855 Patrick died in a snow storm as he attended St. Patrick Day celebrations.

Rechristened Kavanagh in Canada, Patrick and Sarah set about establishing their new lives and local families helped them out until they could fend for themselves. They set up their new home in Jersey Cove, the Gaspe, had four more children and in 1855 Patrick died in a snow storm as he attended St. Patrick Day celebrations. Now 168 years after arriving in the Gaspe, family branches have spread out across Canada, but they still retain the family base in Jersey Cove. Most family branches are French speakers although some remain English speakers. Down the generations the family retained knowledge of, and came in search of, their Sligo roots. But only in recent years were they able to re-establish those roots and reconnect with long lost relatives who will join Rose Marie and Terry on the upcoming walk.

A monument, erected by the parish of St. Patrick’s Montreal, stands in the Gaspe in memory of those who drowned with the sinking of the Carricks. In May 2011 long lost remains were found in what appears to have been a mass grave near where the tragedy occurred. Investigations are underway to determine if these remains are those of Carricks victims.

gaspe carrick-s monument day it was erected

Walk to recall Famine victims offered flight or starvation

From Irish Times

Walk from Roscommon to Dublin honours the ‘missing 1,490’ Strokestown tenants

1490 walk

Frank Hanly and Caroilin Callery at Strokestown Park prepare for Walking in the Footsteps of the Missing 1,490 – A Famine Emigrant’s Walk. Photograph: Brian Farr

Marese McDonagh

Sat, Apr 18, 2015

When Caroilin Callery was a teenager, her father Jim bought the 300-acre Strokestown estate in Co Roscommon from Olive Hales Pakenham.

“It was as if the family had just walked out the door. All their belongings were around; even the family portraits were hanging on the walls. I used to love wandering through the house,” Callery says.

The house was full of history: Pakenham’s ancestor Major Denis Mahon was a landlord who was murdered during the Famine in 1847.

But Jim Callery was less interested in Strokestown House or its history than he was in the lands around it. Indeed, he had only been in the drawingroom of the house at the time he did the deal in 1979. But he needed a few acres to expand his business, and the entire estate was what was on offer. So he took it.

He was somewhat taken aback a few years later when he discovered more than 55,000 musty documents, many relating to the Famine, in the house. For better or worse the family had been entrusted with safeguarding part of the legacy of the Famine, and the National Famine Museum is just one manifestation of that responsibility.

On Saturday, when she and a group of neighbours walk 155km from Strokestown to the Dublin docks, Caroilin Callery will be retracing the steps of the “missing 1,490”, the starving tenants who set out on foot from the estate in May 1847. Major Mahon had offered them the choice of emigration through “assisted passage”, starvation on their blighted potato patch farms or a place in the terrifying local workhouse.

Coffin ships

After walking for days along the tow paths of the Royal Canal to Dublin, the weary men, women and children were put on boats to Liverpool, and from there to Quebec aboard four notorious “coffin ships”.

Caroilin Callery says the Royal Canal was “the N4 of that time” and was the most likely route for Mahon’s tenants.

It was one of the largest “assisted emigration” schemes of the Famine era, a mass movement of people with impossible choices.

While initially dubious about the scheme, the landlord notoriously booked passage for his tenants on cargo ships, rather than passenger ones, and according to some estimates, as many as 50 per cent did not survive the journey to Canada.

“Another very sad and ironic fact is that these people initially travelled to Liverpool on boats loaded with grain from Ireland. They were lying under tarpaulin on deck, on top of this wheat,” says Callery.

She is director of the inaugural Irish Famine Summer School which takes place in Strokestown House from June 17th to 21st . It will be launched by Minister for the Arts Heather Humphreys when she greets the walkers on the Jeanie Johnston on their arrival in Dublin on Wednesday.

Callery says she will be thinking of the tenants as she follows in their footsteps today.

“I will be thinking of the children walking barefoot, the hungry mothers carrying babies, the corpses they must have seen along the canal.

“ I will be thinking about Mary Tighe who is often in my mind, who left with her brother and her five children after her husband Bernard died.”

Survivors

Mary Tighe and three of her children died before their ship docked at Grosse Île. Her son Daniel (12) and daughter Catherine (9) survived, and two years ago Daniel’s great-grandson Richard Tye visited Strokestown in one of the more moving visits of the Gathering.

Callery and her neighbours will spend five days walking, overnighting in Abbeyshrule, Mullingar, Enfield and Maynooth. They are hoping that hundreds will join them along the route.

The scale of the exodus from Strokestown was discovered by Dr Ciarán Reilly from Maynooth University, author of Strokestown and the Great Irish Famine. He says estate bailiff John Robinson, who was paid two shillings to escort the tenants to Liverpool, was “given strict instructions that none were ever to return to Roscommon”.

In November 1847 Major Mahon became the first landlord to be murdered during the Famine.

“Word got back about the condition of the ships. There was a lot of anger,” says Callery

Launch of “Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger” Exhibit

Exhibit Launch Quinnpiac 2

Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute’s new exhibition attracted approximately 100 Irish and Canadian diplomats and scholars last night. The exhibit examines the selfless Grey Nuns, who risked their lives to offer aid to Irish immigrants to Canada afflicted with typhus fever. Read more: http://bit.ly/1C3v6WR The exhibit, which opens today, runs through March 18, 2016 in a room modeled after a coffin ship in Arnold Bernhard Library. Here, Christine Kinealy, director of the institute, offers Barbara Jones, Consul General of Ireland in New York, a preview.

 

Exhibit Launch Quinnpiac

 

President John L. Lahey welcomed Marie-Claude Francoeur, Quebec Delegate to New England, and John Prato, Consul General of Canada in New York, to Quinnipiac University’s Mount Carmel Campus this afternoon for the debut of Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute’s “Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger” exhibition in the Arnold Bernhard Library. The special exhibit opens to the public tomorrow. Read more: http://bit.ly/1C3v6WR

Montreal Irish Memorial Park Foundation at St. Patrick’s Day Parade 2015

From Donovan King:

 

The Mayor Denis Coderre giving the thumbs up when I yelled “Support the Black Rock!”

Montreal St. Patricks Day Parade 2015 Mayor Denis Coderre

Montreal Ireland Memorial Park Foundation St Patricks Day Parade 2015 2

Black Stone Stage Prop

Montreal Irish Memorial Park Foundation

 

Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute to open Grey Nuns exhibition on April 1

Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger Exhibition opens April 1.

Typhus2_nuns

March 11, 2015Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University will open a new exhibition, “Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger,” on Wednesday, April 1 in the Arnold Bernhard Library on the Mount Carmel Campus, 275 Mount Carmel Ave.

The exhibition tells the story of the religious orders in Montreal whose members gave selflessly to Irish immigrants during the summer of 1847 – their time of greatest need.

Christine Kinealy

Christine Kinealy, founding director of Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac and a professor of history, is presenting the exhibition in collaboration with Jason King, Irish Research Council postdoctoral fellow at Moore Institute at Galway University, and the Arnold Bernhard Library.

Many thousands of people fled from Ireland during the Great Hunger and immigrated to Canada. Famine immigrants to Montreal were not only among the poorest of the poor, but many of them arrived already sick with typhus fever. Despite this, a number of people in the English and French Canadian communities provided the ailing and the dying with shelter and support. In the forefront of this compassionate movement were the Sisters of Charity, also known as the Grey Nuns.

“The story of the Grey Nuns, and of the other religious orders who helped the dying Irish immigrants, is one of kindness, compassion and true charity,” Kinealy said. “Nonetheless, almost 6,000 Irish immigrants perished in the fever sheds of Montreal. They had fled from famine in Ireland only to die of fever in Canada. This is a remarkable story that deserves to be better known.”

The year-long exhibition will be housed in the Lender Special Collection Room in the University’s library and will be open to the public from  April 1, 2015 to March 18, 2016. Hours are Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.

The exhibition will be officially launched at a private event on Tuesday, March 31, by the Canadian Consul General (New York); Quebec Delegate to New England (Boston); and the Irish Consul General (NYC). For more information, call (203) 582-2634.

– See more at: http://www.quinnipiac.edu/news-and-events/irelands-great-hunger-institute-to-open-grey-nuns-exhibition-on-april-1/#sthash.cUETwxXi.dpuf

Irish Famine Summer School 2015 at Strokestown Park House and Irish National Famine Museum (June 17-21)

Irish Famine Summer School at Strokestown Park House

Irish Famine Summer School at Strokestown Park House Programme

PROGRAMME

Wednesday 17th June

9:30am – 1:00pm

The Great Irish Famine: New Perspectives

Prof Christine Kinealy- Quinnipiac University, Connecticut, USA
Dr Ciaran Reilly – Maynooth University, Ireland
Dr Jonny Geber – University College Cork, Ireland

2:30pm

Tour of Cruchain Ai- Royal Celtic Site, Tulsk & the 18th Century Windmill, Elphin.

Bus departs – Event Tent – Bawn Street
Booking and tour fee Required

2:00pm – 3:30pm

Local Craft Display – Percy French Hotel

Free

3:30pm

Blas na Gaelige

learn a few phrases of Irish, Town Libary
Free

4:00pm

Secret Areas of Strokestown Park House Tour

Booking and tour fee Required

FREE EVENING

Thursday 18th June

9:30am – 1:00pm

The Great Irish Famine Abroad

Prof Mark McGowan – University of Toronto, Canada
Dr Patrick Fitzgerald – Mellon Centre for Migration, Omagh NI
Dr Perry McIntyre – Global Irish Studies Centre, University of New South Wales

2:30pm

Tour of Rindoon Deserted Medieval Village

Bus departs – Event Tent – Bawn Street
Booking and tour fee Required

2:30pm

Genealogy Centre Workshop

Free

4:00pm

History Walk of the Town

(Meet at the Event Tent) Free

8:00pm

Drama – The Murder of Major Mahon, 1847

Strokestown Park House, Library
Booking and tour fee Required

Friday 19th June

9:30am – 1:00pm

The Great Irish Famine Remembered

Dr Emily Mark-Fitzgerald – University College Dublin, Ireland
Dr Marguerite Corporaal – Radbound University, Nijmegen, Holland
Dr Jason King – NUI, Galway, Ireland

2:30pm – 5:30pm

Tour of Roscommon Workhouse & Quaker Meeting House

Bus departs – Event Tent – Bawn Street
Booking and tour fee Required

1:00 – 3:00pm

Secret Tour of Strokestown…

ending with “Taste of Famine Times’ Soyer soup and Maize Bread
Woodland Walk Restaurant
Booking and tour fee Required

3:30pm

Sliabh Ban Walk through the Ages

(Meet at the Event Tent)

8:00pm

History Hedge School – The Great Irish Famine: Past, Present and Future

Prof Christine Kinealy- Quinnipiac University, Connecticut, USA
Prof Mark McGowan – University of Toronto, Canada
Dr Ciaran Reilly – Maynooth University, Ireland

Percy French Ballroom – Small Entry Fee €

Saturday 20th June

9:00am – 5:00pm

The Local and Regional Impact of the Great Irish Famine

Keynote Speaker: Prof Peter Gray, Queens University Belfast, NI

8:00pm

Conference & Summer School Dinner

Strokestown Park House
Pre Dinner Drinks in the Library
Booking Required – € 50

Sunday 21st June

9:00am – 12:30pm

The Local and Regional Impact of the Great Irish Famine

Closing remarks and discussion

3:00pm

History Walk of the Town

(Meet at the Event Tent) Free

1:00pm – 5:00pm

Olde World Fayre

Bawn Street

Children’s Events – Workshops on Sat / Sun

Facepainting / Fancy Dress / Ice Cream

Irish Famine Summer School in Strokestown officially launched

Strokestown-House-300x200

http://www.shannonside.ie/news/irish-famine-summer-school-in-strokestown-officially-launched/

The Irish Famine Summer School in Strokestown has been officially launched during the recent Roses of Tralee visit to the town.

The summer school to be held in June 2015 follows the success of the International Famine Conference and the National Famine Commemoration held in May.

The summer school is a joint initiative between the Irish Famine Museum, Strokestown Community Development Association, Roscommon County Council and the Centre for the Study of Historic Irish Houses and Estates at NUI Maynooth.

It will also be supported by Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University and St Michael’s College, University of Toronto.

A former student of the University, the Toronto Rose Katie Blundell officially launched the school this week with Roscommon Cathaoirleach John Cummins.

The school will run next year from June 17th to June 21st and will include lectures, workshops, drama, music and excursions of the historic sites in Roscommon.

Call for Papers Famine migration and diaspora: inaugural meeting of the International Network of Irish Famine Studies (INIFS) Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands, 23-24 April 2015

logo nijmegen unief

Inaugural Meeting of International Network of Irish Famine Studies

Call for Papers

Famine migration and diaspora:

inaugural meeting of the

International Network of Irish Famine Studies (INIFS)

 

Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands, 23-24 April 2015

 

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Piaras MacÉinrí (University College Cork)

Jason King (NUI Galway)

Mark McGowan (University of Toronto)

William Smyth (University College Cork)

Laura Izarra (University of São Paolo)

Marguérite Corporaal (Radboud University Nijmegen)

The Great Irish Famine (1845–52) was one of the most influential periods in the history of Ireland and its diaspora. While emigration had already been a common feature in Irish life before the 1840s, the Famine catalysed the process, causing far greater numbers to leave the island and changing the nature of Irish emigration and Irish communities overseas, while also greatly influencing Irish society at home.

On 23–24 April 2015, Radboud University Nijmegen in collaboration with The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) will host the first meeting of the International Network of Irish Famine Studies (INIFS). This network brings together scholars conducting groundbreaking, ongoing research on the Great Irish Famine. As such, it intends to stimulate the development of interdisciplinary dialogues and methodologies necessary to face future challenges of the field of Irish Famine Studies.

Specifically, this inaugural meeting will have Famine migration and diaspora as its theme, focusing on not just the Irish-North-American diaspora, but also Irish migration across the globe, to Latin America and across the Pacific for example. Moreover, it will investigate both the immediate and long-term effects of Famine migration, and will view these processes of migration, settlement and the establishment of transnational overseas communities through an interdisciplinary and comparative lens.

We welcome scholars doing research in the fields of Famine studies and/or Irish migration and diaspora studies to contribute to the meeting, in the form of a paper. Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • The history and historiography of Irish Famine migration;
  • Politics and (trans)nationalism in diaspora;
  • Geographical aspects of Famine migration and diaspora;
  • New methods and methodologies to research Irish migration and diaspora;
  • Cultural memories and identities in diaspora;
  • The process of emigration as seen ‘from back home’;
  • Issues of integration, belonging, exclusion in receiving societies;
  • Literary and artistic representations of the processes of migration and of being in diaspora;

Kenny speaks of ‘slow starving deaths’ at National Famine Commemoration

Kenny speaks of ‘slow starving deaths’ at National Famine Commemoration

Kenny speaks of ‘slow starving deaths’ at Famine memorial

Unveiled memorial carries names of 1,490 from Strokestown who left for Canada on coffin ships

A Great Famine memorial in Dublin (above). When the coffin ships “rampant with cholera and typhus” arrived in Canada “the dead and living were huddled together”, and bodies were pulled from the ships with boat hooks, Taoiseach Enda Kenny told an audience which included 43 ambassadors , Government TDs, returned emigrants and up to 2,000 local people. File photograph: Matt Kavanagh/The Irish Times

 

A Great Famine memorial in Dublin (above). When the coffin ships “rampant with cholera and typhus” arrived in Canada “the dead and living were huddled together”, and bodies were pulled from the ships with boat hooks, Taoiseach Enda Kenny told an audience which included 43 ambassadors , Government TDs, returned emigrants and up to 2,000 local people. File photograph: Matt Kavanagh/The Irish Times

Taoiseach Enda Kenny this evening remembered those who died “slow starving deaths in the fields around here” as he led the National Famine Commemoration atStrokestown House, Co Roscommon.

Mr Kenny unveiled a memorial wall bearing the names of the 1,490 people from the Stokestown estate who left Ireland for Canada on the coffin ships commissioned by local landlord Denis Mahon in 1847.

When the ships “rampant with cholera and typhus” arrived in Canada “the dead and living were huddled together”, and bodies were pulled from the ships with boat hooks, the Taoiseach told an audience which included 43 ambassadors , Government TDs, returned emigrants and up to 2,000 local people.

It has been estimated that 700 of these men, women and children from Strokestown died en route, but one Canadian academic present at today’s sombre ceremony believes the death toll was much higher.

Prof Mark McGowan from the University of Toronto who with Dr Ciarán Reilly fromNUI Maynooth is investigating the fate of those who made it to Canada, pointed out that the figure does not take account of burials at sea and the children who never made it to the new world. “I believe the real figure may be as high as 800,” he said.

The ghosts of those who were driven from Co Roscommon during the Famine and those who died in the ditches, lanes and fields around Strokestown seemed to be present as the ambassadors lined up to lay wreaths near the entrance of Strokestown House. No one was more conscious of this than businessman Jim Callery, who bought the estate in 1979.

One of the first things he found in the Big House among the 40,000 musty documents which were to form the basis of the Famine Museum was the Cloonahee petition of 1846 – a plea from the tenants for help as they faced another winter of starvation. “We cannot much longer withstand their cries for food,” they wrote.

Mr Callery, a native of Cloonahee, found the document in the “smoking room” of the crumbling house he has since restored.

“I was speechless and I can tell you I read it more than once,” he said. “We are not for joining in anything illegal or contrary to the laws of God or the land, unless pressed to, by hunger,” the tenants had warned.

The museum Mr Callery opened on the estate 20 years ago contains many such poignant documents and records of torrid events including the murder of Major Mahona year after he sent hundreds of tenants to their deaths on the coffin ships.

Minister for Arts Jimmy Deenihan, who pointed out that more than 1 million people died during the Famine, stressed the event still casts a shadow. “I am frequently humbled by the respect and empathy Irish people – at home and abroad- have for the victims of the greatest tragedy in our history,” Mr Deenihan, the chairman of National Famine Commemoration committee, said.

Today’s ceremony concluded with prayers for those who “knowingly and unknowlingly turned their backs on the starving”. The ambassadors lined up to show solidarity with those who died.

Many of those who died chose to lie down in the corners of graveyards so that their skeltal remains would rest in consecrated grounds, the Taoiseach noted.