Irish Canadian Famine Research

Irish Canadian Famine Research

Tag: Fever sheds

Newry selected to host Famine commemoration in Northern Ireland for first time

From BBC

Newry to host Irish National Famine Commemoration in September 2015

10 April 2015
National Famine Monument
The National Famine monument, a sculpture of a coffin ship, is at the foot of Croagh Patrick in County Mayo

An annual commemoration of the Irish famine when 1 million people died is to be held in Northern Ireland for the first time.

The Irish arts minister has confirmed that the 2015 famine commemoration will take place on Saturday 26 September in Newry, County Down.

In “the great hunger” of 1845, 1.5 million people emigrated to Canada, America and England.

Many died of typhus on the so-called “coffin ships”.

Irish minister Heather Humphreys said the famine affected all of the island of Ireland.

As a result, the commemoration rotates between its four provinces.

The first commemoration took place in Dublin in 2008 – in total, there have been eight commemorations – and this year, it falls to Ulster.

Famine
A monument in Dublin to those who suffered in the 1845 Irish famine that became known as the Great Hunger

“The annual famine commemoration is a solemn tribute to those who suffered in the most appalling circumstances that prevailed during the Great Famine,” Ms Humphreys said.

“While the scale of suffering was greater in some parts of Ireland than in others, all parts of the island suffered great loss of life and the destruction of families and communities through emigration.

“In this commemoration, we remember all those who suffered, those who died, those who survived but who lost family members, those who were forced to emigrate and those who remained in Ireland but suffered other forms of loss because of the Great Famine.”

In 2011, the commemoration was held in Clones, County Monaghan, in the province of Ulster and Ms Humphreys was present.

1846: A starving boy and girl rake the ground for potatoes at Cahera during the Irish potato famine
1846: A starving boy and girl rake the ground for potatoes at Cahera during the Irish potato famine

“It was very moving to witness the involvement of the entire community in the event and in particular, the participation of children. I look forward to engaging with the local community in Newry, as they bring their unique perspective to remembering one of the most important events in our shared history, and as an Ulster woman, I look forward to participating in the event in Newry in September,” she said.

The minister and the famine commemoration committee welcomed Newry’s strong application, the enthusiasm shown by the local community for the project and their determination to mark the occasion in a fitting, respectful and inclusive manner.

The newly-established Newry, Mourne and Down District Council will take a leading role in organising the commemoration.

The Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht in the Republic of Ireland and the Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure in Northern Ireland will work with the council and other stakeholders.

Launch of “Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger” Exhibit

Exhibit Launch Quinnpiac 2

Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute’s new exhibition attracted approximately 100 Irish and Canadian diplomats and scholars last night. The exhibit examines the selfless Grey Nuns, who risked their lives to offer aid to Irish immigrants to Canada afflicted with typhus fever. Read more: http://bit.ly/1C3v6WR The exhibit, which opens today, runs through March 18, 2016 in a room modeled after a coffin ship in Arnold Bernhard Library. Here, Christine Kinealy, director of the institute, offers Barbara Jones, Consul General of Ireland in New York, a preview.

 

Exhibit Launch Quinnpiac

 

President John L. Lahey welcomed Marie-Claude Francoeur, Quebec Delegate to New England, and John Prato, Consul General of Canada in New York, to Quinnipiac University’s Mount Carmel Campus this afternoon for the debut of Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute’s “Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger” exhibition in the Arnold Bernhard Library. The special exhibit opens to the public tomorrow. Read more: http://bit.ly/1C3v6WR

Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University to open exhibition, ‘Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger,’ on April 1

Famine-Exhibition-Map-FT5S

Hartford Courant article on “Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger” exhibit

Famine-Exhibition-MI

New exhibition explores aid given to famine-time Irish immigrants in Montreal

New Exhibition on Famine Irish in Montreal

From Irish Central.com

Frances Mulraney

Famine-Exhibition-MI

Letter of June 19, 1847 to Mother McMullen”

A new exhibition at Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University explores famine-time immigrants in Montreal and the selfless acts of those who helped them during the summer of 1847.

Opening on April 1, “Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger” delves into Montreal records to bring the story of the religious orders who came to the aid of Irish immigrants when they needed it most.

The exhibition is presented by Christine Kinealy, founding director of the Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute and a professor of history at Quinnipiac, in collaboration with Jason King, Irish Research Council postdoctoral fellow at Moore Institute at Galway University, and the Arnold Bernhard Library.

 The year-long exhibition looks at the thousands of Irish who left Ireland to escape the famine and immigrated to Canada. Upon arrival in Canada, however, the suffering of many famine Irish continued, as they remained among the poorest of the poor and some of them were stricken with typhus fever following the long voyage.
 
Grey Nuns Motherhouse. Photo by: Thomas1313/Wiki Commons

Grey Nuns Motherhouse. Photo by: Thomas1313/Wiki Commons

In acts of extreme kindness, a number of people in the English and French Canadian communities came to their aid and provided shelter and support for those ailing and dying. Leading the charge in helping the Montreal Irish were the Sisters of Charity, also known as the Grey Nuns.

“The story of the Grey Nuns, and of the other religious orders who helped the dying Irish immigrants, is one of kindness, compassion and true charity,” Kinealy said.

“Nonetheless, almost 6,000 Irish immigrants perished in the fever sheds of Montreal. They had fled from famine in Ireland only to die of fever in Canada. This is a remarkable story that deserves to be better known.”

Visitors to the exhibition can expect to see an 1848 painting, commissioned by the Bishop of Montreal, depicting the Grey Nuns in action as they tended to the poor, maps outlining the fever sheds where the sick were kept in isolation, records the Order kept on the children they attended when they had lost their families and a Grey Nun habit (a black and brown dress despite their name) among other items collected over the past six months.

A map taken from the exhibition. Title: “’The Terrible Epidemic of 1847” by National Federation Boxer, pub. John Lovell, Montreal

A map taken from the exhibition. Title: “’The Terrible Epidemic of 1847” by National Federation Boxer, pub. John Lovell, Montreal

Another interesting item in the collection is a letter written by one of the sisters, telling a person that they had items of their father’s following his death and were attempting the return the items to his family. Speaking to IrishCentral, Christine Kinealy said that this shows the level of kindness and compassion shown by the nuns during these years. Putting themselves in danger of disease, they tended the sick and looked after newly-orphaned Irish children.

“These children left their homeland, embarked on a long voyage, arrived to Canada and then lost their parents. The Grey Nuns were then so kind to them – what would have happened to these children if it wasn’t for the Grey Nuns?”

“It’s important to remember that the nuns were also French-Canadian, they weren’t Irish. It just shows the general compassion they had to put their own lives in danger for others.”

The Grey Nuns were founded in 1738 by Marguerite d’Youville as a religious association to care for the poor. The congregation became an official religious institution meaning the nuns swear normal three vows of poverty, chastity and obedience as well as an extra pledge to devote their lives to the service of suffering humanity. From the 1840s onwards, they expanded enormously to become a major provider of healthcare and other social services throughout Quebec, Western and Northern Canada, and the northern United States.

The Grey Nuns acts of kindness saved many children. Photo by: James Duncin/Wiki Commons

The Grey Nuns acts of kindness saved many children. Photo by: James Duncin/Wiki Commons

The exhibition will be available to the public from April 1, 2015 to March 18, 2016 in the Lender Special Collection Room in the university’s library. Hours are Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. The exhibition will be officially launched at a private event on Tuesday, March 31, by the Canadian Consul General (New York); Quebec Delegate to New England (Boston); and the Irish Consul General (NYC).

 

 

Montreal Irish Memorial Park Foundation at St. Patrick’s Day Parade 2015

From Donovan King:

 

The Mayor Denis Coderre giving the thumbs up when I yelled “Support the Black Rock!”

Montreal St. Patricks Day Parade 2015 Mayor Denis Coderre

Montreal Ireland Memorial Park Foundation St Patricks Day Parade 2015 2

Black Stone Stage Prop

Montreal Irish Memorial Park Foundation

 

Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute to open Grey Nuns exhibition on April 1

Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger Exhibition opens April 1.

Typhus2_nuns

March 11, 2015Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac University will open a new exhibition, “Saving the Famine Irish: The Grey Nuns and the Great Hunger,” on Wednesday, April 1 in the Arnold Bernhard Library on the Mount Carmel Campus, 275 Mount Carmel Ave.

The exhibition tells the story of the religious orders in Montreal whose members gave selflessly to Irish immigrants during the summer of 1847 – their time of greatest need.

Christine Kinealy

Christine Kinealy, founding director of Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute at Quinnipiac and a professor of history, is presenting the exhibition in collaboration with Jason King, Irish Research Council postdoctoral fellow at Moore Institute at Galway University, and the Arnold Bernhard Library.

Many thousands of people fled from Ireland during the Great Hunger and immigrated to Canada. Famine immigrants to Montreal were not only among the poorest of the poor, but many of them arrived already sick with typhus fever. Despite this, a number of people in the English and French Canadian communities provided the ailing and the dying with shelter and support. In the forefront of this compassionate movement were the Sisters of Charity, also known as the Grey Nuns.

“The story of the Grey Nuns, and of the other religious orders who helped the dying Irish immigrants, is one of kindness, compassion and true charity,” Kinealy said. “Nonetheless, almost 6,000 Irish immigrants perished in the fever sheds of Montreal. They had fled from famine in Ireland only to die of fever in Canada. This is a remarkable story that deserves to be better known.”

The year-long exhibition will be housed in the Lender Special Collection Room in the University’s library and will be open to the public from  April 1, 2015 to March 18, 2016. Hours are Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday, noon to 5 p.m.

The exhibition will be officially launched at a private event on Tuesday, March 31, by the Canadian Consul General (New York); Quebec Delegate to New England (Boston); and the Irish Consul General (NYC). For more information, call (203) 582-2634.

– See more at: http://www.quinnipiac.edu/news-and-events/irelands-great-hunger-institute-to-open-grey-nuns-exhibition-on-april-1/#sthash.cUETwxXi.dpuf

Jacob Ellgood’s Eyewitness Testimony of Montreal’s Famine Irish Fever Sheds in 1848

 

 

Source:

The Montreal Standard

Old Home Numbers

Sept. 13-20 1909

Jacob Ellgood Sixty Years of Progress in Montreal LAC File

 

Jacob Ellegood’s Testimony about Famine Irish Fever Sheds in 1848 and Father Patrick Dowd:

Ellgood Fever Sheds Testimony

 

Montreal in the decades after the Irish Famine Migration:

Montreal of Half a century ago

 

What happened to Thomas Treacy?

Toronto Star.

Remnants of Toronto’s History

Our readers tell us about heirlooms, photos and other mementoes that evoke the city’s past.

By: LESLIE SCRIVENER STAFF REPORTER, Published on Sun Mar 11 2007

In the summer of 1847, a seven-year-old orphan, Brigit Ann Treacy, arrived in Toronto half-starved, but carrying a small treasure – a gold-painted cream jug which was her sole keepsake from her home in Ireland. Passage on the famine ship Jane Black had been perilous; there was little food or water. Brigit Ann had been so hungry she’d chewed on her leather shoelaces.

She was travelling with her aunt, Peggy Ryan Clancy. There was to have been a third passenger, her younger brother, Thomas, but he disappeared in the chaos of boarding ship on the docks at Limerick. It’s not known what became of him.

Aunt and niece settled in Whitby, where Peggy worked as a cook. Brigit Ann grew to be a beautiful young woman who one year was named the “belle of Whitby,” her great-granddaughter Terry Smith recalls. Smith, a former Ontario deputy-minister of culture, has inherited the creamer, which she keeps in her grandmother’s china cabinet. She runs a company, Philanthropic Partnerships Inc., which matches donors with charities, and is the only famine descendent on the board of the Ireland Park Foundation, which is creating a park scheduled to open at Bathurst Quay in June.

Brigit Ann was one of the 38,000 Irish immigrants who landed in Toronto in 1847, having fled the Irish potato famine, which killed one million people over six years. Many arrived at the docks sick with typhus; 1,110 died by the end of 1847.

The story of her great-grandmother’s arrival and survival, told through generations in her family, is also the story of the settlement of Canada, Smith says. Brigit Ann married Michael John McTague, another Irish immigrant, and had four children, including Norah, Smith’s grandmother, who raised nine children. Smith has traced more than 200 of Brigit Ann’s descendants in Canada and the U.S.

“This little jug reminds us all where we came from and the struggle our ancestors took to make a new life here,” she wrote in a note to the Star.

Last fall Smith and her sister Sheila Kirk found Brigit Ann’s tombstone in St. Michael’s cemetery near Yonge St. and St. Clair Ave. She died in 1924, when she was 84. Brigit Ann’s aunt, Peggy, lived to be 103.

Smith’s thoughts went back to the 1847 crossing. “It gave us a sense of peace,” Smith says, “to find the site where this woman was buried, once a frightened little girl arriving in a new land with only a gold creamer jug in her hand.’

But there are still unknown elements in this story. Smith still wants to find out what happened to Brigit Ann’s brother, the little boy who was lost or left behind at the docks.

Toronto Ireland Park

 

INAUGURAL IRISH FAMINE SUMMER SCHOOL: Call for Papers (Deadline February 15)

Strokestown Park House Glass Memorial Wall

                   INAUGURAL IRISH FAMINE SUMMER SCHOOL  JUNE 17 – 21 

 CALL FOR PAPERS – Feb 15 Deadline

International Speakers:   17– 19  June

Papers :   20 & 21 June

‘The Local and Regional impact of the Great Irish Famine.’

We are calling for applications for 15 – 20 minute Papers on how the Great Famine impacted on your area or region – be it a local, national or international location.

Enquiries and proposals of no more than 250 words, accompanied by a short biography should be sent to Dr Ciaran Reilly – ciaran.j.reilly@nuim.ie. Decisions on proposals as decided by the organizing Committee will be communicated by the end of February.

Full exciting Programme can be viewed on http://www.irishfaminesummerschool.com

Irish Famine Summer School Programme

Call for Papers: Famine migration and diaspora (Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands, 23-24 April 2015)

sulivan_2c_famine_281911_29

Call for papers Famine migration and diaspora

Call for Papers

Famine migration and diaspora:

inaugural meeting of the

International Network of Irish Famine Studies (INIFS)

Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands, 23-24 April 2015

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Piaras MacÉinrí (University College Cork)

Jason King (NUI Galway)

Mark McGowan (University of Toronto)

William Smyth (University College Cork)

Laura Izarra (University of São Paolo)

Marguérite Corporaal (Radboud University Nijmegen)

The Great Irish Famine (1845–52) was one of the most influential periods in the history of Ireland and its diaspora. While emigration had already been a common feature in Irish life before the 1840s, the Famine catalysed the process, causing far greater numbers to leave the island and changing the nature of Irish emigration and Irish communities overseas, while also greatly influencing Irish society at home.

On 23–24 April 2015, Radboud University Nijmegen in collaboration with The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) will host the first meeting of the International Network of Irish Famine Studies (INIFS). This network brings together scholars conducting groundbreaking, ongoing research on the Great Irish Famine. As such, it intends to stimulate the development of interdisciplinary dialogues and methodologies necessary to face future challenges of the field of Irish Famine Studies.

Specifically, this inaugural meeting will have Famine migration and diaspora as its theme, focusing on not just the Irish-North-American diaspora, but also Irish migration across the globe, to Latin America and across the Pacific for example. Moreover, it will investigate both the immediate and long-term effects of Famine migration, and will view these processes of migration, settlement and the establishment of transnational overseas communities through an interdisciplinary and comparative lens.

The expert meeting will consist of keynote lectures and presentations by senior scholars from various disciplines. However,  INIFS also attaches great importance to emerging scholarship in the field, and therefore we would like to encourage PhD candidates doing research in the fields of Famine studies and/or Irish migration and diaspora studies to contribute to the meeting, in the form of a paper. Topics may include but are not limited to:

·     The history and historiography of Irish Famine migration;

·     Politics and (trans)nationalism in diaspora;

·     Geographical aspects of Famine migration and diaspora;

·     New methods and methodologies to research Irish migration and diaspora;

·     Cultural memories and identities in diaspora;

·     The process of emigration as seen ‘from back home’;

·     Issues of integration, belonging, exclusion in receiving societies;

·     Literary and artistic representations of the processes of migration and of being in diaspora;

·     The various cultural encounters between the Irish diaspora and other ethnic communities in their new homelands;

·     The Irish diaspora in comparison to other diasporic communities;

·     The immediate and long-term effects of Famine migration for the Irish and the receiving countries.

If you are a PhD candidate and would like to participate in the form of a paper presentation (in English, not exceeding 20 minutes), please send a 250-300 abstract and short bio to l.janssen@let.ru.nl, before 15 February 2015. We will select a maximum of 8 PhD candidates, who will be invited to present their papers and will receive feedback from a senior respondent from the field. Accommodation for 2 nights and conference participation will be arranged and paid for by the INIFS network. We will not cover travel expenses.

For further enquiries, please contact Lindsay Janssen at l.janssen@let.ru.nl. Additional information will be published on the INIFS website: www.ru.nl/irishfaminenetwork.

Best wishes,

The directors of INIFS:

Marguérite Corporaal (Radboud University Nijmegen)

Oona Frawley (NUI Maynooth)

Luke Gibbons (NUI Maynooth)

Peter Gray (Queen’s University Belfast)

Andrew Newby (University of Helsinki)

The management assistants of INIFS:

Christopher Cusack (Radboud University Nijmegen)

Lindsay Janssen (Radboud University Nijmegen)