Irish Canadian Famine Research

Irish Canadian Famine Research

Tag: Death or Canada Thomas D’Arcy McGee Summer School Ireland Quebec Ontario Toronto Irish Famine Orphans Ireland 1847 Diaspora Integration Montreal

The Orphan Who Saw the Light: A six-year old Thomas Quinn found a warm welcome waiting in Quebec (Irish Independent Feb. 17 2017)

thomas-quinn-famine-orphan-irish-independent-feb-17-2017-cropped

thomas-quinn-irish-indepedenent-feb-17-2017

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http://faminearchive.nuigalway.ie/eyewitness-accounts/famine-orphans/quinn-tighe

 

 

Famine walk from Roscommon reaches Dublin

From Irish Times (April 22, 2015)

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/religion-and-beliefs/famine-walk-from-roscommon-reaches-dublin-1.2185538

Walk, in period costume, commemorated 1847 walk when 1,490 starving tenants from Strokestown walked to Dublin and boarded a ship for Canada

Famine walkers reach Dublin

Famine walkers on the final few steps of their 155km Famine re-enactment walk from Roscommon to the Jeanie Johnston in Dublin. Photograph: Alan Betson

Patsy McGarry

As they began the 155 km Famine commemorative walk from Strokestown, Co Roscommon to Dublin last weekend, participants’ thoughts turned to migrants drowning in the Mediterranean. “While exploring our past we are always conscious that the experience is someone else’s present,” Caroilin Callery, one of the walkers, said when they finished the walk in Dublin.

The walk, in period costume, commemorated one in 1847 when 1,490 starving tenants from the Mahon estate in Strokestown walked to Dublin and boarded the ship Naomi for Canada.

“Seven hundred of them died at sea,” Ms Callery said. On Monday she got a text to say 700 migrants had drowned off the coast of Libya. It was “gut-wrenching”, she said.

Ms Callery, along with Patricia Rogers, Mick Blanch, Gerard Glennon, Bernie Kelly and broadcaster Cathal Póirtéir, finished up at the Jeanie Johnston tall ship on Custom House Quay in Dublin.

Summer school

They were met by Minister for Arts Heather Humphreys, who launched the programme for the inaugural Irish Famine Summer School in Strokestown in June. Described by co-ordinator Dr Ciarán Reilly of NUI Maynooth as “the biggest conference on the Irish Famine ever held to date”, it takes place from June 17th to 21st.

The Minister told the walkers: “You’ve brought life to history and history to life.”

She said the National Famine Commemoration Day on September 26th would be marked in Northern Ireland for the first time at Newry, Co Down.

“The Famine was an event felt by all religions and all cultures on this island. It was one of the most important events in our shared history, a bit like World War one,” she said.

Tim O’Connor, chairman of The Gathering in 2013, described the Irish diaspora as “a great global parish joined by geography and time”, much of it rooted in migration as a result of the Famine.

Schoolgirl Maeve Tighe read her poem The Journey.

Roscommon county council acting chief executive Tommy Ryan described Strokestown House as “a great asset” in an “unknown” county. The house was bought 35 years ago by Jim Callery who has overseen its preservation and the setting up of a Famine Museum there.

He attended the launch of the summer school programme with his wife Adeline. Their daughter Caroilin spoke of his huge personal and financial commitment to Strokestown House. “We’re extremely proud of him.”

After the Famine Walk, Caroilin Callery travelled straight to the inaugural meeting of the International Network of Irish Famine Studies at Radboud University Nijmegen in the Netherlands:

Caroilin at IINS o

IINS group photo

INIFS Group Photo

Jason at IINS 2

Programme Expert Meeting International Network of Famine Studies

‘Famine Migration and Diaspora’

Radboud University Nijmegen

23-24 April 2015

23 april

9:30   Opening, Gymnasion (GN) 3

9.45-10:45:   William Smyth (University College Cork), “Famine, emigration and the

transformation of southern Irish society 1845-1916”. GN 3

10.45-11.15:  Coffee/tea

11.15-12:15:   Mark McGowan (University of Toronto), “Finding the People of the

Famine Diaspora: A Preliminary Report on the Strokestown  ‘1490’ in 1847”. GN 3

12.15-13:15:  Lunch, Foyer GN

13.15-14:15:  Jason King (NUI Galway), “Performing Famine Memory: Irish Theatre and

the Great Hunger during the Rise and Fall of the Celtic Tiger”. GN 3.

14.15-15:45:  Panel session 1, GN2.

Aaron Roberts (University of California Riverside), “Fleeing and Starving: Settler Colonial Biopolitics in Ireland and Palestine”;

and response by David Nally (University of Cambridge).

Pawel Hamera (University of Cracow), “ ‘A Good Riddance’: the 1851 Irish

Census, the Mass Emigration and the British Press”.

15.45-16.15:   Tea/coffee

16.15-17.00: Plenary discussion, GN 3. Contributions by Peter Gray (Queen’s University Belfast) and Emily Mark FitzGerald (University College Dublin).

18:30 – :  Dinner at Vlaams Arsenaal

24 april

9.45-10:45:  Laura Izarra (University of Sao Paolo), “Memories of Leaving and the

Language of Return”. GN3.

10.45-11.15:   Coffee/tea

11.15-12:15:    Piaras MacÉinri (University College Cork), GN 3

12.15-13:15:  Lunch, Foyer GN

13.15-14:15: Marguérite Corporaal (Radboud University Nijmegen), “From Restoration to Reinscription: Remembering the Famine in Irish North-American Fiction”. GN3.

14.15-15:45:   Panel session 2: GN2.

Frank Rynne (Université Paris 2 Panthéon-Assas), “The Returned American: Irish Americans, the American Diaspora and The Land War 1879-82”.

Caroilin Callery (Strokestown Park), “Memories of Leaving and the Language of Return”.

15.45-16.15:   Tea/coffee

16:15-17:00: Plenary discussion, GN 3. Contributions by Jason King (NUI Galway) and Andrew Newby (University of Helsinki).

17.00-18:00:  Goodbye and drinks, Foyer GN

Newry selected to host Famine commemoration in Northern Ireland for first time

From BBC

Newry to host Irish National Famine Commemoration in September 2015

10 April 2015
National Famine Monument
The National Famine monument, a sculpture of a coffin ship, is at the foot of Croagh Patrick in County Mayo

An annual commemoration of the Irish famine when 1 million people died is to be held in Northern Ireland for the first time.

The Irish arts minister has confirmed that the 2015 famine commemoration will take place on Saturday 26 September in Newry, County Down.

In “the great hunger” of 1845, 1.5 million people emigrated to Canada, America and England.

Many died of typhus on the so-called “coffin ships”.

Irish minister Heather Humphreys said the famine affected all of the island of Ireland.

As a result, the commemoration rotates between its four provinces.

The first commemoration took place in Dublin in 2008 – in total, there have been eight commemorations – and this year, it falls to Ulster.

Famine
A monument in Dublin to those who suffered in the 1845 Irish famine that became known as the Great Hunger

“The annual famine commemoration is a solemn tribute to those who suffered in the most appalling circumstances that prevailed during the Great Famine,” Ms Humphreys said.

“While the scale of suffering was greater in some parts of Ireland than in others, all parts of the island suffered great loss of life and the destruction of families and communities through emigration.

“In this commemoration, we remember all those who suffered, those who died, those who survived but who lost family members, those who were forced to emigrate and those who remained in Ireland but suffered other forms of loss because of the Great Famine.”

In 2011, the commemoration was held in Clones, County Monaghan, in the province of Ulster and Ms Humphreys was present.

1846: A starving boy and girl rake the ground for potatoes at Cahera during the Irish potato famine
1846: A starving boy and girl rake the ground for potatoes at Cahera during the Irish potato famine

“It was very moving to witness the involvement of the entire community in the event and in particular, the participation of children. I look forward to engaging with the local community in Newry, as they bring their unique perspective to remembering one of the most important events in our shared history, and as an Ulster woman, I look forward to participating in the event in Newry in September,” she said.

The minister and the famine commemoration committee welcomed Newry’s strong application, the enthusiasm shown by the local community for the project and their determination to mark the occasion in a fitting, respectful and inclusive manner.

The newly-established Newry, Mourne and Down District Council will take a leading role in organising the commemoration.

The Department of Arts, Heritage and the Gaeltacht in the Republic of Ireland and the Department of Culture, Arts and Leisure in Northern Ireland will work with the council and other stakeholders.

Ireland Park Foundation and INUA Partnership support Dr. George Robert Grasett Park in Toronto and new academic research

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From the Ireland Park Foundation and INUA Partnership:

Ireland Park Foundation INUA Partnership

Dr. George Robert Grasett Park

Patch of Green to Honour Those who helped Irish Immigrants

Ireland Park Foundation has recently embarked on the creation of a second park in Toronto City Centre, commemorating the medical and clerical staff who sacrificed their lives assisting the Irish migrants in 1847. iNua Partnership will work with Ireland Park to maximise awareness for this ambitious new commemorative space, both in Canada and Ireland. The ultimate aim of course is to generate significant new streams of fundraising revenue to put towards the development of the Park and achieve its goal of being completed by June 21st 2016.

Toronto Ireland Park

Academic Research

The tradition of storytelling is an acclaimed part of Ireland’s culture that has positively influenced our reputation around the world.

So much of the extraordinary journey that carried our Irish ancestors to Canada can be told through storytelling. As a Partner to the Foundation, iNua Partnership is committed to keeping those stories alive and ensuring that we pass memories through stories to the next generation. To this end, iNua Partnership has commissioned NUI Galway’s Dr. Jason King to conduct new research to help uncover the remarkable and deeply personal stories of some of the thousands of Irish men, women and children who left from Cork and Limerick for Canada during the Famine years. These stories, in time, will be shared with you all.

Montreal Irish Memorial Park Foundation at St. Patrick’s Day Parade 2015

From Donovan King:

 

The Mayor Denis Coderre giving the thumbs up when I yelled “Support the Black Rock!”

Montreal St. Patricks Day Parade 2015 Mayor Denis Coderre

Montreal Ireland Memorial Park Foundation St Patricks Day Parade 2015 2

Black Stone Stage Prop

Montreal Irish Memorial Park Foundation

 

Jacob Ellgood’s Eyewitness Testimony of Montreal’s Famine Irish Fever Sheds in 1848

 

 

Source:

The Montreal Standard

Old Home Numbers

Sept. 13-20 1909

Jacob Ellgood Sixty Years of Progress in Montreal LAC File

 

Jacob Ellegood’s Testimony about Famine Irish Fever Sheds in 1848 and Father Patrick Dowd:

Ellgood Fever Sheds Testimony

 

Montreal in the decades after the Irish Famine Migration:

Montreal of Half a century ago

 

What happened to Thomas Treacy?

Toronto Star.

Remnants of Toronto’s History

Our readers tell us about heirlooms, photos and other mementoes that evoke the city’s past.

By: LESLIE SCRIVENER STAFF REPORTER, Published on Sun Mar 11 2007

In the summer of 1847, a seven-year-old orphan, Brigit Ann Treacy, arrived in Toronto half-starved, but carrying a small treasure – a gold-painted cream jug which was her sole keepsake from her home in Ireland. Passage on the famine ship Jane Black had been perilous; there was little food or water. Brigit Ann had been so hungry she’d chewed on her leather shoelaces.

She was travelling with her aunt, Peggy Ryan Clancy. There was to have been a third passenger, her younger brother, Thomas, but he disappeared in the chaos of boarding ship on the docks at Limerick. It’s not known what became of him.

Aunt and niece settled in Whitby, where Peggy worked as a cook. Brigit Ann grew to be a beautiful young woman who one year was named the “belle of Whitby,” her great-granddaughter Terry Smith recalls. Smith, a former Ontario deputy-minister of culture, has inherited the creamer, which she keeps in her grandmother’s china cabinet. She runs a company, Philanthropic Partnerships Inc., which matches donors with charities, and is the only famine descendent on the board of the Ireland Park Foundation, which is creating a park scheduled to open at Bathurst Quay in June.

Brigit Ann was one of the 38,000 Irish immigrants who landed in Toronto in 1847, having fled the Irish potato famine, which killed one million people over six years. Many arrived at the docks sick with typhus; 1,110 died by the end of 1847.

The story of her great-grandmother’s arrival and survival, told through generations in her family, is also the story of the settlement of Canada, Smith says. Brigit Ann married Michael John McTague, another Irish immigrant, and had four children, including Norah, Smith’s grandmother, who raised nine children. Smith has traced more than 200 of Brigit Ann’s descendants in Canada and the U.S.

“This little jug reminds us all where we came from and the struggle our ancestors took to make a new life here,” she wrote in a note to the Star.

Last fall Smith and her sister Sheila Kirk found Brigit Ann’s tombstone in St. Michael’s cemetery near Yonge St. and St. Clair Ave. She died in 1924, when she was 84. Brigit Ann’s aunt, Peggy, lived to be 103.

Smith’s thoughts went back to the 1847 crossing. “It gave us a sense of peace,” Smith says, “to find the site where this woman was buried, once a frightened little girl arriving in a new land with only a gold creamer jug in her hand.’

But there are still unknown elements in this story. Smith still wants to find out what happened to Brigit Ann’s brother, the little boy who was lost or left behind at the docks.

Toronto Ireland Park

 

INAUGURAL IRISH FAMINE SUMMER SCHOOL: Call for Papers (Deadline February 15)

Strokestown Park House Glass Memorial Wall

                   INAUGURAL IRISH FAMINE SUMMER SCHOOL  JUNE 17 – 21 

 CALL FOR PAPERS – Feb 15 Deadline

International Speakers:   17– 19  June

Papers :   20 & 21 June

‘The Local and Regional impact of the Great Irish Famine.’

We are calling for applications for 15 – 20 minute Papers on how the Great Famine impacted on your area or region – be it a local, national or international location.

Enquiries and proposals of no more than 250 words, accompanied by a short biography should be sent to Dr Ciaran Reilly – ciaran.j.reilly@nuim.ie. Decisions on proposals as decided by the organizing Committee will be communicated by the end of February.

Full exciting Programme can be viewed on http://www.irishfaminesummerschool.com

Irish Famine Summer School Programme

Call for Papers Famine migration and diaspora: inaugural meeting of the International Network of Irish Famine Studies (INIFS) Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands, 23-24 April 2015

logo nijmegen unief

Inaugural Meeting of International Network of Irish Famine Studies

Call for Papers

Famine migration and diaspora:

inaugural meeting of the

International Network of Irish Famine Studies (INIFS)

 

Radboud University Nijmegen, the Netherlands, 23-24 April 2015

 

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Piaras MacÉinrí (University College Cork)

Jason King (NUI Galway)

Mark McGowan (University of Toronto)

William Smyth (University College Cork)

Laura Izarra (University of São Paolo)

Marguérite Corporaal (Radboud University Nijmegen)

The Great Irish Famine (1845–52) was one of the most influential periods in the history of Ireland and its diaspora. While emigration had already been a common feature in Irish life before the 1840s, the Famine catalysed the process, causing far greater numbers to leave the island and changing the nature of Irish emigration and Irish communities overseas, while also greatly influencing Irish society at home.

On 23–24 April 2015, Radboud University Nijmegen in collaboration with The Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) will host the first meeting of the International Network of Irish Famine Studies (INIFS). This network brings together scholars conducting groundbreaking, ongoing research on the Great Irish Famine. As such, it intends to stimulate the development of interdisciplinary dialogues and methodologies necessary to face future challenges of the field of Irish Famine Studies.

Specifically, this inaugural meeting will have Famine migration and diaspora as its theme, focusing on not just the Irish-North-American diaspora, but also Irish migration across the globe, to Latin America and across the Pacific for example. Moreover, it will investigate both the immediate and long-term effects of Famine migration, and will view these processes of migration, settlement and the establishment of transnational overseas communities through an interdisciplinary and comparative lens.

We welcome scholars doing research in the fields of Famine studies and/or Irish migration and diaspora studies to contribute to the meeting, in the form of a paper. Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • The history and historiography of Irish Famine migration;
  • Politics and (trans)nationalism in diaspora;
  • Geographical aspects of Famine migration and diaspora;
  • New methods and methodologies to research Irish migration and diaspora;
  • Cultural memories and identities in diaspora;
  • The process of emigration as seen ‘from back home’;
  • Issues of integration, belonging, exclusion in receiving societies;
  • Literary and artistic representations of the processes of migration and of being in diaspora;

Award winning Docudrama “Death or Canada” to be screened at Thomas D’Arcy McGee Summer School in Carlingford, County Louth on 19 August 2014

“Death or Canada”
A Gemini and IFTA Nominated, two-part Canadian-
Irish docudrama.
Mark G. McGowan, Professor of History,
The University of Toronto

Created by Ballinran Productions / Tile Films
Written by Craig Thompson
Directed by Ruán Magan
Country of origin Canada, Ireland
Original language(s) English
No. of episodes 2
Cinematography Colm Whelan