Ireland Park Foundation and INUA Partnership Launched by Canadian Ambassador to Ireland Kevin Vickers

by irishcanadianfamineresearcher

From Irish Times (April 24, 2015):

Robert Kearns and INUA partnership

Kevin Michael Vickers, Canadian ambassador of Canada to Ireland; Noel Creedon, chief executive of iNua Partnership; and Robert Kearns, chairman of Ireland Park Foundation. Photograph: Naoise Culhane

Irish emigré Robert G Kearns has prospered in his adopted home of Toronto, building an insurance business over the 35 years since departing Ireland. Kearns was back in Ireland last week to promote the Ireland Park Foundation, a charitable nonprofit organisation he set up to celebrate the story of the Irish in Canada.

The foundation raised 3.7 million Canadian dollars (about €2.8 million) to build Ireland Park on Toronto’s waterfront – the successful realisation of Kearns’s ambition to create inspiring spaces in Canada that both celebrate and commemorate Ireland’s presence in Canada, where about 4.4 million Canadians – 13 per cent of the population – trace their ancestry to Ireland

Kearns was home for an event at the Canadian embassyto announce that investment group iNua Partnership has signed up as a corporate partner and fundraising affiliate the foundation. While he may be a long time out of Ireland, his family is well known here. Robert is brother to president of the High Court, Mr Justice Nicholas Kearns.

The Ireland Park Foundation iNua Partnership supports commemorative activities and academic research on the Famine Irish in Canada:

http://inuapartnership.ie/ireland-park-foundation/

Academic Research

So much of the extraordinary journey that carried our Irish ancestors to Canada can be told through storytelling. As a Partner to the Foundation, iNua Partnership is committed to keeping those stories alive and ensuring that we pass memories through stories to the next generation. To this end, iNua Partnership has commissioned NUI Galway’s Dr. Jason King to conduct new research to help uncover the remarkable and deeply personal stories of some of the thousands of Irish men, women and children who left from Cork and Limerick for Canada during the Famine years.

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